FAQs

NHS Girls' hockey coach Brent Bielenberg takes you on a tour of the current Northfield ice arena.

Q: We already have an ice arena -- shouldn't we repair what we have?
A: An estimated $7 million would need to be invested in remodeling the current facility to replace the refrigeration system, renovate the deficient bathrooms, increase the size of the lobby to accommodate program growth and event traffic, and build out locker rooms that would allow a team to sit together. With this approach, the community won't benefit from the economic impact of a multi-use facility -- and estimated $1.8 million each year -- and hockey teams, which have grown significantly in recent years -- will continue to travel for ice time, recreational curlers won't find ice in Northfield, event planners won't have access to a large, flexible space, and baseball and softball players won't have an indoor option other than the at-capacity Dundas Dome.


Q: What will the Northfield ballot say?
A: Residents in Northfield will be asked to vote on whether to approve a property tax increase ($7.50 per month on a $200,000 home) and a one-half of one percent sales tax on goods purchased in Northfield (not including clothing and groceries). The ballot will read: Shall the City of Northfield be authorized to (a) impose a sales and use tax of one-half of one percent (0.50%) and a motor vehicle excise tax of up to $20 per motor vehicle for approximately 20 years or until approximately $17,800,000 plus an amount equal to interest and the cost of the issuance of any bonds is raised, and (b) issue its general obligation bonds in an aggregate principle amount not to exceed $17,800,000 plus the cost of issuing the bonds, to finance any or all of the following: the acquisition, construction and betterment of parks, trails and recreational facilities and the acquisition, construction and betterment of a new multi-purpose combination civic center and ice arena?
The financing for this referendum has been thoroughly reviewed by Kennedy & Graven, a law firm that specializes in local government in Minnesota.


Q: What will the Dundas ballot say?
A: Residents in Dundas will be asked to vote on whether to approve a one-half of one percent sales tax on goods purchased in Dundas (not including clothing and groceries). The ballot will read: Shall the City of Dundas be authorized to impose a sales and use tax of one-half of one percent (0.50%) and a motor vehicle excise tax of up to $20 per motor vehicle for the longer of 20 years or until approximately $3,500,000 is raised to finance any or all of the following: the acquisition, construction and betterment of parks, trails and recreational facilities and the acquisition, construction and betterment of a new multi-purpose combination civic center and ice arena in Northfield?
The financing for this referendum has been thoroughly reviewed by Kennedy & Graven, a law firm that specializes in local government in Minnesota.


Q: What's in the name Cannon River Civic Center?
A: The Cannon River Civic Center is so much more than an ice arena. The name appropriately conveys the facility's location along the Cannon Valley Trail portion of the Mill Towns Trail, the multi-use purpose of the space, and the regional hub its presence will create for Northfield, Dundas and surrounding communities.


Q: Who uses the current ice arena?
A: The following groups use the current ice arena and are welcome in the new Cannon River Civic Center: Northfield Hockey Association, Northfield High School Boys & Girls hockey teams, Northfield Skating School, St. Olaf College Men's and Women's teams, Carleton College Men's and Women's club teams, Northfield Community Ed & Rec, community open skate sessions, and Northfield Hospital Auxiliary.


Q: What is the cost of the new Cannon River Civic Center?
A: The cost to build the Cannon River Civic Center is $21.2 million. It is a stunning example of a public-private partnership, including: 1) Seven acres of donated land; 2) Northfield and Dundas residents approving a 1/2 cent local option sales tax generating $7 million or more over 20 years. An additional $3 million or more will be generated to support parks, trails and recreational facilities in Northfield and Dundas; 3) Northfield residents approving an increase in property taxes to generate $8.8 million over a 20-year term; 4) $2 million generated from a Mighty Ducks Grant, naming rights, advertising, and the sale of the existing arena; 5) $3.4 million privately raised by dedicated members of our community.


Q: What will the property tax increase be for an average sized home?
A: Northfield residents with a home valued at $200,000 will see an increase of $7.50 per month.


Q: Who will use the Cannon River Civic Center?
A: The Cannon River Civic Center will be a multi-purpose, year-round facility. We imagine it is a space that will serve hockey players, figure skaters and recreational skaters, event planners and conference hosts, artists, baseball and softball players, recreational cyclists, lacrosse players, and so many more.


Q: How much money has been raised so far?
A: Fundraising momentum has been building since July when the Northfield and Dundas councils voted to move the questions to finance the Cannon River Civic Center to voters. Several pledges have been made, and we're looking forward to announcing leadership gifts soon.


Q: Why should the Cannon River Civic Center be city-funded?
A: The community’s investment in a multi-purpose facility such as the Cannon River Civic Center is comparable to its investments in other facilities – the swimming pool, the NCRC, and the Library, to name a few. It is expected improve the quality of life in our community and serve a range of people and needs. Like many projects of its size, the up-front capitol is a significant hurdle, but with conservative projections showing that the Cannon River Civic Center will cash flow positive and contribute more than $1.8 million annually to the area’s economy, it’s a worthwhile investment that will serve future generations.